340th Bombardment Group, USAAF

340th Bombardment Group, USAAF


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340th Bombardment Group, USAAF

History - Books - Aircraft - Time Line - Commanders - Main Bases - Component Units - Assigned To

History

The 340th Bombardment Group, USAAF, was a B-25 Mitchell group that served in North Africa, Sicily and Italy, initially acting in support of the British Eighth Army before moving on to support the combined Allied armies in Italy.

The group was activated on 20 August 1942, and was equipped with the B-25 Mitchell. It reached North Africa in March 1943, where it joined the Ninth Air Force (although it came under the operational control of the international Northwest African
Tactical Air Force). The group began operations in April 1943 and remained in combat for the next two years. During that period it attacked targets across Tunisia, Sicily, Italy, France, Austria, Bulgaria, Albania, Yugoslavia and Greece. Its main targets included airfields, transport links, German troop concentrations and defensive positions and some factories.

In June 1943 the group took part in the massive series of air attacks that forced the surrender of Pantelleria and Lampedusa islands. In July 1943 it attacked the beaches being used by German troops being evacuated from Messina to the mainland of Italy.

The group was awarded a Distinguished Unit Citation for its activities between April and August 1943 when it was acting in support of the British Eighth Army during its action in Tunisia and the Allied invasion forces in Sicily.

In September 1943 the group supported the landings at Salerno, helping to defeat a strong German attack on the beachhead. From January to June 1944 it was used to support the Allied advance on Rome.

On the night of 12-13 May 1944 the group was the victim of one of the few effective German air raids of the period when it lost a number of aircraft after a force of Junkers Ju-88s bombed Alesan. Despite this blow the group was still able to carry out a raid of its own on the next day.

By the summer of 1944 the 340th was something of a specialist bridge-busting unit. Along with the 310th and 321st Bombardment Groups it was achieving one direct hit for every twenty sorties, an impressive success rate against bridges which were narrow difficult targets that needed direct hits if any real damage was to be done.

On 23 September the group carried out a raid on La Spezia designed to prevent the Germans from sinking a cruiser as a block ship in the harbour entrance. Eighteen aircraft from the group attacked the ship, sinking it before it could move into place. This was recorded by General Cannon as the group's sixty-second successful precision attack in a row! The group won a second DUC for this raid.

The group could bring a significant number of aircraft to bear on any particular target. On 16, 17 and 19 November, as part of a campaign to isolate the German front lines from their supplies, the group carried out 114 effective sorties against bridges on the Lamone River at Faenza (not counting aircraft that failed to reach their target). The group flew a series of attacks on German lines of communication including the Brenner Pass from September 1944 to April 1945.

The Group returned to the US in July-August 1945 and was inactivated on 7 November 1945.

Books

To Follow

Aircraft

1942-: North American B-25 Mitchell

Timeline

10 August 1942Constituted as 340th Bombardment Group (Medium)
20 August 1942activated
March 1943To Mediterranean and Ninth Air Force
August 1943To Twelfth Air Force
July-August 1945To United States
7 November 1945Inactivated

Commanders (with date of appointment)

Lt Col Adolph E Tokaz:3 Sep 1942
Col William C Mills: 21 Sep1942
Lt Col Adolph E Tokaz: 7 May 1943
Col Charles D Jones: 8 Jan 1944
Col WillisF Chapman: 16 Mar 1944- 7 Nov 1945

Main Bases

Columbia AAB, SC: 20 Aug1942
Walterboro, SC: 30 Nov 1942-30 Jan1943
El Kabrit, Egypt: Mar 1943
Medenine,Tunisia: Mar 1943
Sfax, Tunisia:Apr 1943
Hergla, Tunisia: 2 Jun 1943
Comiso, Sicily: c. 2 Aug 1943
Catania,Sicily: 27 Aug 1943
San Pancrazio, Italy:c. 15 Oct 1943
Foggia, Italy: 19 Nov 1943
Pompeii, Italy: c. 2 Jan 1944
Paestum,Italy: 23 Mar 1944
Corsica: c. 14 Apr 1944
Rimini, Italy: c. 2 Apr-27 Jul 1945
SeymourJohnson Field, NC: 9 Aug 1945
ColumbiaAAB, SC: 2 Oct-7 Nov 1945

Component Units

486th Bombardment Squadron: 1942-45; 1947-49
487th Bombardment Squadron: 1942-45; 1947-49
488th Bombardment Squadron: 1942-45; 1947-49
489th Bombardment Squadron: 1942-45; 1947-49

Assigned To

March-August 1943: Ninth Air Force
August 1943-44: 57th Bombardment Wing; XII Tactical Command; Twelfth Air Force
1944: 57th Bombardment Wing; XII Bomber Command; Twelfth Air Force
1944-45: 57th Bombardment Wing; Twelfth Air Force


340th Bomb Squadron

340th Bomb Squadron- a modern recreation of the squadron patch. The patch shows the Disney characters, Huey, Dewey and Louie, (Donald Duck's nephews) commandeering a bomb in flight at an angle. Huey is perched at the front, ready to drop a bomb of his own Dewey is in the middle with his hands on a control stick Dewey attends to the rear with an anti-aircraft gun. The bomb and crew are shown against a cartoon cloud the cloud is in the foreground of a blue sky. If you look VERY CLOSELY at the insignia on the jacket of Glen V Leland (5th from left, the picture of the bomber crew of the 97th Bomb Group) you can make out the faint outlines of this same patch.

A bomber crew of the 97th Bomb Group with their B-17 Flying Fortress. They are from left to right: Lieutenant Frank R. Beadle, of Grand Rapids, Michigan Sergeant Chester Love, of Cincinnati, Ohio Sergeant Richard Williams, of Utica, New York Lieutenant Levon Ray, of Poolville Texas Glen V. Leland, of St. Petersburg, Florida Sergeant Frank Rebello, Tiverton, Rhode Island Sergeant Joseph Cummings, of Oskaloosa, Iowa and Sergeant Zane Gemmill, of St. Clair, Pennsylvania. Image stamped on reverse: 'Passed for publication 18 Aug 1942' [stamp], 'Associated Press.' [stamp], 'USA(BRI)CCC' [ written annotation]. '216113'[ Censor no]. Printed caption on reverse: 'U.S. FLYING FORTRESSES RAID IN DAYLIGHT Associated press photo shows: The crew who flew the leading Flying Fortress in the raid are seen here lined up under the nose of the plane. Left to right they are Lieut. Frank R Beadle, of Grand Rapids, Michigan Sergeant Chester Love, of Cincinnati, Ohio Sergeant Richard Williams, of Utica, New York Lieut. Levon Ray, of Poolville Texas Glen v. Leland, of St.Petersburg, Florida Sergeant Frank Rebello, Tiverton, Rhode Island Sergt Joseph Cummings, of Oskaloosa, Iowa and Serg. Zane Gemmill, of ST. Clair, Penn. AKP/ROB 249453 18842a.'

Knoxville News-Sentinel-March 2, 1943-Robert Bowers-shoots down Italian plane

ROBERT BOWERS WWII Article-Kingsport Times-page 6-9 Sept 1943-1 of 2

Knoxville News-September 9, 1943-Robert Bowers-2 of 2

William Bowers obituary-Lakeland Ledger-11 Nov 1985

Back row: 2nd from left Co-Pilot Billy Rose-KY, 3RD Bombardier, 4th Navigator Albert George Betette-CA, 5th Pilot Sam Constantine-NY, 6th Tail Gunner William Robert Bowers-Knoxville, Tennessee (Note the Thunderbird patch on Robert’s left shoulder)


Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

In August 1951, Strategic Air Command selected Sedalia Air Force Base, MO to be a site of one of its new bombardment wings, with both bombers and tankers assigned to the unit. Construction of facilities to support SAC's first all-jet bomber, the B-47, and the KC-97 aerial refueling tanker was conducted by the 4224th Air Base Squadron until Oct. 20, 1952, when it inactivated while turning over the base to the 340th Bombardment Wing. SAC scheduled the 340th to received the command's newest aircraft systems, the B-47 Stratojet and KC-97 tanker. Construction workers soon completed runway repairs and other projects in November 1953, paving the way for the arrival of the first B-47 in March 1954. On Dec. 3, 1955, Sedalia AFB became Whiteman AFB.

From 1955 to 1960, the 340th BMW played a key role in SAC's mission of strategic deterrence. Its men and women were on the front line of the nation's strategic defense -- a force for peace that helped preserve America's freedom and safeguarded the world from another world war.

The 340th BMW gradually phased out operations at Whiteman during 1963, with its remnants transferring to Bergstrom AFB, Texas, on 01 September 1963.

In 1959 Second Air Force activated the 4130th Strategic Wing at Bergstrom Air Force Base, Austin, Texas. General Howard W. Moore was assigned as commander of the 4130th Strategic Wing, where he organized and upgraded the wing to combat-ready status. The 4130th Strategic Wing at Bergstrom was inactivated on 01 September 1963. The B-52 aircraft of the wing's 335th Bombardment Squadron were transferred to the newly-arrived 340th Bomb Wing. The wing's 486th Bombardment Squadron remained at Bergstrom through 1966.


WW2 US Army USAAF 9th Air Force 366th Fighter Group Patch S-12

Seller: abqmetal ✉️ (32,396) 99.8% , Location: APO, AP , Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 363281834773 WW2 US Army USAAF 9th Air Force 366th Fighter Group Patch S-12. Thank you for looking at my auction. This patch is 6 by 4 3/4 inches. Please look over the patch to make sure it is perfect for you. Some have writing on the back and others have a small amount of glue from sample books. Please e-mail me if you need to get a picture of the back or need the measurements. Shipping charges are set on the idea of a regular envelope going 1st Class Postal for $1.00 to the US and $2.00 for all other locations. If you would like your item mailed by either registered mail or priority with tracking number the cost will be $5.50. I will give combined shipping discounts. Lastly, I live overseas and at times the mail service here takes a little longer than I would like, but as you can see by my feedback, almost all my customers are repeat customers which I am very grateful for. If you would like your patch shipped by FedX or UPS I can do this at an added expense. Thank you all for looking and good luck with the auction. Condition: Used , Condition: Condition is great for the age and has only minor wear and tear. This patch has no glue on back and has been kept in a pet/smoke free environment. Thank you for looking. , Restocking Fee: No , All returns accepted: Returns Accepted , Item must be returned within: 30 Days , Refund will be given as: Money Back , Return shipping will be paid by: Buyer See More


Community Reviews

Catch-22 is my all time favorite book. So when I learned about The Bridgebusters: The True Story of the Catch-22 Bomb Wing, it immediately shot to the top of my Goodreads "Want to Read" list. It has everything to make it a perfect read for me: airplanes, history and Heller. Then I found out about The True Story of Catch 22: The Real Men and Missions of Joseph Heller&aposs 340th Bomb Group in World War II, written by the daughter of the real Colonel Cathcart, so I daisy-chained right into what turned Catch-22 is my all time favorite book. So when I learned about The Bridgebusters: The True Story of the Catch-22 Bomb Wing, it immediately shot to the top of my Goodreads "Want to Read" list. It has everything to make it a perfect read for me: airplanes, history and Heller. Then I found out about The True Story of Catch 22: The Real Men and Missions of Joseph Heller's 340th Bomb Group in World War II, written by the daughter of the real Colonel Cathcart, so I daisy-chained right into what turned out to be the Yin for Cleaver's Yang.

The Bridgebusters is a history book of the 57th Bomb Wing in which Joseph Heller served as a bombardier on a B-25 during World War II. Cleaver details the missions primarily in the context of the Allied campaign to liberate Italy which, frankly, I am less familiar with than Operation Overlord and the action of the Eighth Air Force's B-17s bombing Germany from England. Heller is shown as the cog he was in the U.S. fighting machine that defeated the Nazis and Cleaver puts forth an interesting theory of the author's true relationship to Yossarian.

The True Story of Catch-22 is less a history book and more a collection of personal memoirs of the men of Heller's 488th squadron. As the daughter of the unit's commanding officer, Meder has a direct and much more personal relationship with the subject and her focus is mapping the novel's characters to real men fighting a real war, which is a much different story than Bridgebusters, but an equally interesting one, especially with all of the pictures she pulled out of her father's attic

Now that I've read "the rest of the story," as Paul Harvey was fond of saying, I'm re-reading Catch-22. On a personal note, having attempted a satirical novel (In the Black: 1965-1969) based on personal experiences and inspired by Heller's masterpiece, these books were a fascinating study in the tangled web of fact and fiction for me. . more

When I was sixteen my English teacher gave us an alphabetical list of classic books to choose from. We were supposed to read one each semester. Being a huge fan of lists and books, this was great for me and I decided to start with A and read the first book under each letter. I remember I read All Quiet on the Western Front for A and Catch-22 was the first book under C. (I can&apost remember what "B" was.)

To quote from Catch-22, it was love at first sight.

Since that time, I&aposve pretty much always bee When I was sixteen my English teacher gave us an alphabetical list of classic books to choose from. We were supposed to read one each semester. Being a huge fan of lists and books, this was great for me and I decided to start with A and read the first book under each letter. I remember I read All Quiet on the Western Front for A and Catch-22 was the first book under C. (I can't remember what "B" was.)

To quote from Catch-22, it was love at first sight.

Since that time, I've pretty much always been reading Catch-22. I've lost track of how many times I've finished it. I love the humor, the feeling, the message. I love Yossarian. It is an absolutely brilliant masterpiece to me.

I did learn early on, though, that it was not a book for everyone. Especially in a conservative, religious community. Which is fine. I just stopped recommending it to people. (Luckily I have one friend who loves it as much as I do, so we can gab about it.)

One of my friends, knowing my mad love affair with the novel, got me this book as a pressie. (I have awesome friends.) I finally got around to reading it! (I have very large stacks of books, so it sometimes takes me awhile.)

I think what I loved most about this book was that it was a labor of love. The author is the daughter of one of the original soldiers, and I think more than relating this to Catch-22, she wanted to tell her father's story and write a book for him. I love that so much. It's important to tell our family stories, and there are not many of "the greatest generation" left.

If I'm being honest, my favorite parts of this book were the quotes from Catch-22. :D (What can I say, I'm obsessed.) I also liked the section where she did a brief description, including a photo, of the real people the characters in the book were based on. This was toward the middle of the book and I thought it would've been better at the beginning. She also had soldiers tell their stories in their own words, which was fascinating. Some were easier to read than others. I'm afraid I glazed over a bit when they were going on and on about all the plane controls. I also really appreciated the diagrams and photos of the bomber planes. It helped with my visualization quite a bit.

Thank you Kristi for knowing me so well and for this lovely pressie! . more

Not to be Missed If You Read Catch-22

As one of my next books to read is Catch-22 (I have already started it to be fully honest). I thought this might help understand it better. I got this through Kindle Unlimited.

This is actually quite good, which surprised me. The men who were still alive when this book was researched helped with the first hand information/ memories and self identification as various characters. This was very informative for the book.

Having first hand "oral history" or even not Not to be Missed If You Read Catch-22

As one of my next books to read is Catch-22 (I have already started it to be fully honest). I thought this might help understand it better. I got this through Kindle Unlimited.

This is actually quite good, which surprised me. The men who were still alive when this book was researched helped with the first hand information/ memories and self identification as various characters. This was very informative for the book.

Having first hand "oral history" or even notes from various mission logs (with photos) has been a great story, even if Catch-22 had not been written.

The thing that really got me is Mt. Vesuvius really did erupt and bury planes. One person estimated 88 B-25 bombers were destroyed, at at cost of $250 million. I cannot even imagine how much that is in today's dollars! (I looked it up: $6,280,825,000.) Because of a volcano.

Much of the oral history either self-identified as one character or another, and it appears the ones who were deceased were identified by the others as who was which character.

This is a treasure, not only as a companion to the book, but as looking at WWII through the eyes of those who were there.

If you have read Catch-22, this is a great refresher, and you may re-read the book again. If you have just been assigned Catch-22, reading this first will be a great help. Reading this after will also be a great opportunity to fully comprehend the humor brought to the book by Mr. Heller. And yes, he is definitely Yossarian.

There really was a Major Major Major, and reading how he got his name is hysterical.

There are photographs (although this book has an illustrated version, with the author doing the illustrations). Speaking of the author, she is the daughter of one of the characters, so the loving hand that wrote this has special place in her heart.

Ending with the full mission book of George Wells (Capt. Wren) made it even more poignant.

This is a must read. Period, full stop. It adds a depth to the original book that can't be found anywhere else.

As we learned from M*A*S*H, war is hell, but humor helps.

As neither a war buff or a relative of the participants, this book appealed to me only for background of the group and on the real people who Joseph Heller transformed into characters.

Heller joined the bomb group on the Italian island of Corsica as a nineteen year old. Nine years later, he began writing the story.

In his book, Heller becomes John Yossarian, an Assyrian, who embodied Heller’s thoughts, mannerisms and creativity. They shared a devil-may-care attitude and a logical outlook as well As neither a war buff or a relative of the participants, this book appealed to me only for background of the group and on the real people who Joseph Heller transformed into characters.

Heller joined the bomb group on the Italian island of Corsica as a nineteen year old. Nine years later, he began writing the story.

In his book, Heller becomes John Yossarian, an Assyrian, who embodied Heller’s thoughts, mannerisms and creativity. They shared a devil-may-care attitude and a logical outlook as well as an irreverent and quirky sense of humor.

This book also described flak, which comes from the name of a German anti-aircraft canon that fired twenty-pound shells. The crew aimed it at aircraft flying two hundred miles an hour at an altitude of one or two miles. The gun fired ahead of the formation so that the rockets exploded when the planes approached that spot, exploding hundreds of iron shards in all directions.

(On his fifteenth mission, Dad’s B-17 took flak, crippling it and forcing it to land in Switzerland, which interned him and the crew for the remainder of the war. Although he served as a navigator during the same period that Heller served as bombardier, Dad flew from a base on the other side of Italy.) . more

The author&aposs personal attachment and passion for the subject overcome somewhat disjointed repetition and what I would consider to be poor editing. Nevertheless, a great companion book to Heller&aposs novel.

Those unfamiliar with the book who are B25 fans and those interested in the air war in Italy will find it informative.

Clearly a labor of love. The author's personal attachment and passion for the subject overcome somewhat disjointed repetition and what I would consider to be poor editing. Nevertheless, a great companion book to Heller's novel.

Those unfamiliar with the book who are B25 fans and those interested in the air war in Italy will find it informative.

This book is a good companion to Catch-22. Written by the daughter of Colonel Chapman, on whom Col. Cathcart was based, it provides the history of the 340th Bomb Group in which Joseph Heller was a bombardier during WWII. The last living member, George Wells, provided his memories, insights, and mission log, in addition to many other research materials.

The writing is not that of a professional writer - the metaphors are often lugubrious and the text is repetitive - but she is passionate about her This book is a good companion to Catch-22. Written by the daughter of Colonel Chapman, on whom Col. Cathcart was based, it provides the history of the 340th Bomb Group in which Joseph Heller was a bombardier during WWII. The last living member, George Wells, provided his memories, insights, and mission log, in addition to many other research materials.

The writing is not that of a professional writer - the metaphors are often lugubrious and the text is repetitive - but she is passionate about her topic and it is fascinating. Part I details four of the central characters part II depicts as many of the members of the bomb group as Chapman Meder could trace, replete with photos and their own perspectives part III includes 12 true short stories from the bomb group.

Here's the breakdown of who was who:
- Yossarian was how Joseph Heller wished he could have acted. The name came from a colleague Yohannan, who was Syrian.
- General Dreedle - General Robert D. Knapp (who lived down the street from the Wright brothers in Alabama and flew from the 1910's)
- Colonel Cathcart - Colonel Willis F. Chapman (Mt. Vesuvius blew soon after he took over the 340th the eruption destroyed all their planes. He relocated them to Corsica, got new planes with more accurate sighting technology, and devised many training maneuvers to make the "Unlucky 340th" the most accurate bomb group in the Air Force)
- Chaplain Tappman - Chaplain James H. Cooper
- Doc Daneeka - Captain Benjamin J. Marino
- Captain Pilchard - Captain Fred W. Dyer (who tied with George Wells for the most missions flown during WWII - 102)
- Major Danby - Major Joseph Ruebel
- Chief White Halfoat/Havermyer - Captain Vincent Myers (known as chief, one of the best bombardiers)
- Captain Wren - Captain George L. Wells (who flew 102 missions, and seems to have been fairly fearless)
- Major __de Coverly - Major Charles J. Cover (among the older members of the group, he was something of a father figure. He did go ahead of the group into newly captured territories and secure lodgings and supplies for the officers and enlisted men)
- Hungry Joe - Joseph Chrenco, pilot
- Major Major Major Major - Major Major
- Milo Minderbinder - Benjamin Kanowski (pilot, mess officer)
- Soldier in white - those killed in the war
- Douglas Orr - Douglas Orr (bombardier and navigator) and Edward Ritter (pilot)
- Luciana - girl Heller met in Rome
- Kid Sampson - Bill Simpson (pilot)
- Colonel Moodus - Lt. Robert Knapp, Jr (Gen Knapp's son)
- The Dead Man in Yossarian's tent - the belongings of a solider killed before his orders arrived that remained in Heller's tent for months until red tape cleared them to return to the U.S.

The B-25 was tight, and the nose in which the bombardiers crouched was plexiglass. It was too small to take their parachutes. And it was largely freezing cold (Col. Chapman arranged for space heaters later in the war).

Mostly, reading this book made me want to reread Catch-22 with a more adult wisdom and empathy for what Heller went through. . more

An above average compare/contrast of Joseph Heller&aposs characters in his work of fiction and the men that served as models for those characters. I find it interesting that some say Heller blindsided his models. I think that, at some level, they were happy with their fame. Reaching mid-life, with fame of their WWII efforts dwindling, and Heller puts them in the spot light. They may not of liked that Heller wrote a sarcastic, anti-war piece, and included them or caricatures of them but not blindside An above average compare/contrast of Joseph Heller's characters in his work of fiction and the men that served as models for those characters. I find it interesting that some say Heller blindsided his models. I think that, at some level, they were happy with their fame. Reaching mid-life, with fame of their WWII efforts dwindling, and Heller puts them in the spot light. They may not of liked that Heller wrote a sarcastic, anti-war piece, and included them or caricatures of them but not blindsided.

Technically, the author should have verified descriptive facts regarding the aircraft, North American's B-25 "Mitchell". It is after all, a primary character in both books. Keys are not used in military aircraft as part of the start sequence. Can you imagine a cockpit crew looking at each other asking, "OK, who has the keys?" Yes, the ground crew would "pull" or rotate the engines by moving the propellers through their normal rotation. That movement was to move oil from bottom cylinders of the engine. This is a prestart process not part of the start sequence. (p113)

Yes, there are two pedals on the floor two, that is, in front of each pilot, and they are not the accelerator and brake. Input to one the three flight controls through these pedals provide pilots the ability to control the rudder(s). Wheel brakes, located only on main landing gear, are also controlled by application of toe pressure to the top of the rudder pedals. (p113)

There are other misstatements regarding the airplane. Are these errors in fact any more than mere distractions to those who know the facts? Are they even worthy of discussion to others unaware of aircraft systems? Do these errors indicate there are or may be other errors in fact?

I very much liked the stories shared by various members of the 340BG. Their glimpses into life in the MTO made the book for me.

Did Joseph Heller commit a disservice to the members of the 340th Bomb Group when he wrote Catch-22? Did author Patricia Chapman Meder write an apologetic defending the real four officers some feel Joesph Heller blindsided when he made them into Catch-22&aposs four heavy hitters?

"The True Story of Catch - 22: The Real Men and Missions of Joseph Heller&aposs 340th Bomb Group in World War II" is a combination of both plus I feel some admiration for Joseph Heller making those men infamous.

There is a reason Did Joseph Heller commit a disservice to the members of the 340th Bomb Group when he wrote Catch-22? Did author Patricia Chapman Meder write an apologetic defending the real four officers some feel Joesph Heller blindsided when he made them into Catch-22's four heavy hitters?

"The True Story of Catch - 22: The Real Men and Missions of Joseph Heller's 340th Bomb Group in World War II" is a combination of both plus I feel some admiration for Joseph Heller making those men infamous.

There is a reason the original Catch-22 is found in the fiction not nonfiction section of bookstores. Joseph Heller didn't write a memoir of his service during World War II. He wrote a satirical and somewhat historical novel.

Patricia Chapman Meder uses rare and unpublished photos to bring our actual heroes to life through use of first person narrative.

There is a third part in her book that is actually the book's heart. She takes twelve men of the 340th and relates twelve true tales.

Fans of Catch-22 will enjoy the book. It makes good use of diaries, logs, and photos to bring the people to life. For those unfamiliar with Catch-22 the book will make you curious enough to pickup Heller's book.

"The True Story of Catch - 22: The Real Men and Missions of Joseph Heller's 340th Bomb Group in World War II" would make a nice companion volume or commentary for the serious student of the original work. It would make a nice inclusion in university or community libraries as a resource for Joseph Heller's book.

I recommend "The True Story of Catch - 22: The Real Men and Missions of Joseph Heller's 340th Bomb Group in World War II" by Patricia Chapman Meder. The publisher is Casemate Publishing. . more


Nose art and named planes of the USAAF during WWII

The project's purpose is to gather and record information and photographs on named or embellished planes of all types which served with the USAAF in all theatres of operation and to detail the work done by those men (and women) who painted nose art - including civilian personnel.

More than simply recording the basic information of aircraft serial numbers and codes, details are gathered from veterans' recollections, diary notes, official archive records, photographs, press releases, photo albums, scrap books, news clippings and documents to build up as comprehensive a record as possible of the history and fate of each aircraft, its mission list, crews and casualties, ground crew, modifications, etc. Veterans who flew or maintained the aircraft are sought and their information on missions, modifications, battle damage, ultimate fate and any other stories about their planes are gathered. Information relating to the naming of the plane, its origin, when, where, why and by whom is also sought as is any information on the men and women who painted the art works on the aircraft and crew jackets. Over the past years correspondence has been maintained with many hundreds of veterans and their familes. If you have any information or photographs relating to any named plane I would like to hear from you and to be able to record and incorporate your material into the project's files.

So far, the project has resulted in the publication of four printed books based upon some of the material gathered.

The first, " Plane Names & Fancy Noses - The 91st Bomb Group (Heavy) " is a detailed study of 300+ named B17 Flying Fortresses which served with 91st Bomb Group (Heavy) flying from Bassingbourn in England.

The second, Tales to Noses over Berlin is devoted of the twenty daylight raids made by the 8th Air Force on Berlin during 1944 and 1945, supplementing official US and German archives records with the stories of some of the named planes which flew to or were lost over that target.

The third title is a detailed study of the named planes of the 100BG(H)
" Plane Names & Bloody Noses "

The fourth publication is a book devoted to the daylight missions flown against the huge and important Leuna synthetic oil plant: " Merseburg : Blood, Flak & Oil. "

Released in December 2012 is the first ebook produced for KINDLE and other ebook formats:
" The Flight Of Eagles - USAAF Evasion in Occupied Europe, December 1943 "
A study of the 121 airmen who successfully evaded capture and returned to England based on their details and secret interrogations made only days after their return.

On-going research involves the gathering of information, photos and crew/mission/damage data to provide individual airplane profiles as well as information relating to artists or any person (military or civilian) responsible for naming or painting aircraft. Information on the origin of specific nose arts or themes is also being gathered.

A signed Limited Edition full colour print of the cover painting by Ray Bowden for "Plane Names & Fancy Noses - 91BG" is also available for purchase.

If you have information regarding WWII Nose Art which you can share, please get in touch using the Contact Us link above. Many thanks.


340th Bombardment Group, USAAF - History

Pilot 2nd Lt. Alfred P. Crosswhite, USAAF O-789797 (KIA / BR)
Co-Pilot 2nd Lt. William R. Werden, USAAF O-797889 (KIA / BR)
Bombardier S/Sgt Waythe Van Hoy, USAAF 18102538 (KIA / BR)
Radio Operator Sgt Joseph A. Paradiso, USAAF 11024488 (KIA / BR)
Gunner S/Sgt Thomas O. Evers, USAAF 39680590 (KIA / BR) CO
Crew Chief S/Sgt Orville E. Luallen, USAAF 38032713 (KIA / BR)
Engineer Sgt Henry Nerone, Jr, USAAF 11011605 (KIA / BR)
Passenger 2nd Lt. Jarvis E. Bishop, USAAF O-649015 (KIA / BR)
Passenger S/Sgt Gardner F. Galeucia, USAAF 11024367 (KIA / BR)
Passenger Cpl Albert W. Niedzwicki, USAAF 33001257 (KIA / BR) Baltimore, MD
Passenger T/Sgt Albert L. Rowley, USAAF 6968484 (KIA / BR)
Crashed December 15, 1942
MACR 16497

Aircraft History
Built by North American in Ingelwood, California. Ferried overseas via Hawaii to Australia.

Wartime History
Assigned to the 3rd Bombardment Group, 90th Bombardment Squadron. No known nose art or nickname.

Mission History
On December 15, 1942 one of five B-25s from the 3rd Bomb Group that took off from Port Moresby on a flight bound for Charters Towers. Somewhere near Cooktown, this B-25 separated from the main group and was last seen heading towards the mountains and crashed.

Recovery of Remains
On November 3, 1943 an American recovery team visited the crash site and recovered the remains of the crew.

According to the Missing Aircrew Report (MACR):
"Five bodies recovered 3 November 1943 approximately 40 miles west of Cardwell, Queensland, had been definitely identified as the remains of Crosswhite, Evers, Galeucia, Luallen and Vanhoy.&rdquo

During July 16-18, 1945 the remains of the above five crew members were buried at the U.S. Cemetery at Ipswich.

Wreckage
Crashed near Cooktown. The crash site was visited on November 3, 1943 and the remains of the crew were recovered. Today, someone has removed the wreckage piece by piece and it now sits on a property just north of Kennedy. The original landowners were extremely angry the wreckage had been removed.

Memorials
The entire crew was officially declared dead the day of the mission. Postwar, the entire crew was permanently buried in a group burial at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery at section 79 site 361-361B.

Crosswhite also has a memorial marker at East Hill Cemetery in Bristol, TN.

Contribute Information
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WWII USAAF 22nd Bomb Squadron, 341st Bomb Group Unit CBI Theatre History <p> NOT AVAILABLE

ARTIFACT: This is a unit history of the United States Army Air Forces 22nd Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 341st Bombardment Group. After starting off in 1939 as the 22nd Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), the squadron was reorganized as the 22nd Bomb Group (Medium) in 1942. They moved around quite a bit, traveling to Brazil, South Africa, and Egypt before serving in the China-Burma-India Theatre, flying B-25 bombers. Some of the members of the 22nd had been a part of Jimmy Doolittle's famous "Tokyo Raid". The unit history covers 1942 through 1945, and there is also a separate three page stapled article on the 22nd's history from 1918 though World War II.

VINTAGE: Published circa 1945.

SIZE: 30 pages (plus 3 separate Xeroxed pages), approximately 11" in height and 8-1/2" in width.

MATERIALS / CONSTRUCTION: Oaktag cover, paper.

ATTACHMENT: Stapled binding.

MARKINGS: Printed and Designed by Graphic Art Students of Eastern Montgomery County Area Vocational/Technical School.

ITEM NOTES: This is from a United States Army Air Forces unit history collection that we will be listing more of over the next few months. VAJX00 LADEX9/13 SABEX12/14

CONDITION: 7+ (Very Fine+): The history has some light wear/discoloration along the edge of the covers.

GUARANTEE: As with all my artifacts, this piece is guaranteed to be original, as described.


340th Bombardment Group, USAAF - History

Background
The U.S. Army Air Force (USAAF) 22nd Bombardment Group (Medium) nicknamed "Red Raiders" was assigned to the 5th Air Force (5th AF) in the South West Pacific Area (SWPA) during World War II.

Headquarters Squadron (HQ Squadron)
Sent overseas from the United States to Australia. On February 25, 1942 arrives Brisbane. On March 7, 1942 the Headquarters Squadron moves to Ipswich.

2nd Bombardment Squadron (2nd BS)
The 2nd Bombardment Squadron (Medium) was later renamed the 2nd Bombardment Squadron (Heavy). On February 25, 1942 arrives Brisbane.

18th Reconnaissance Squadron (18th RS)
The 18th Reconnaissance Squadron (Medium) was sent to Australia in April 1942 redesignated 408th Bombardment Squadron (Medium).

19th Bombardment Squadron (19th BS)
The 19th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) was later renamed the 19th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy). On February 25, 1942 arrives Brisbane.

33d Bombardment Squadron (33rd BS)
The 33rd Bombardment Squadron (Medium) was later renamed the 33rd Bombardment Squadron (Heavy). On February 25, 1942 arrives Brisbane.

408th Bombardment Squadron (408th BS)
During April 1942 the 18th Reconnaissance Squadron was redesignated 408th Bombardment Squadron (Medium).


Rare WWII USAAF 380th Bomb Group (aka "The Flying Circus") Unit History

ARTIFACT: This is a rare hardcover copy of "The History of the 380th Bomb Group (H) AAF Affectionately Known as The Flying Circus November 1942-September 1945". This unit history originally belonged to flight crew gunner Sgt. Theodore L. Arnheiter, Jr. of the 528th Bomb Squadron, who wrote his name inside the front cover. The cover of the history has a great embossed insignia showing a lion swatting Germany which reads "King of the Heavies". The book has several impressive black-and-white photographs and a roster. Attached to the 5th Air Force and in cooperation with the Royal Australian Air Force, the 380th had many firsts, including breaking all distance records on its mission to Balikpapan, Borneo, and flying the first loaded B-24 bomber to successfully come out of a spin (see photo above).

VINTAGE: Published circa 1945-1946 (post-World War II).

SIZE: 190 pages approximately 12" in height and 9" in width.

MATERIALS / CONSTRUCTION: Cloth-bound cover, paper.

ATTACHMENT: Glued binding.

MARKINGS: T.L. Arnheiter, Jr. Sgt. 528th Bomb Squadron written inside front cover Designed and Printed by Commanday-Roth Co. Inc. New York City, N.Y. on last page.

ITEM NOTES: This is from a United States Army Air Forces unit history collection that we will be listing more of over the next few months. VBEX06 LBGEX10/13 SBGEX12/13

CONDITION: 6 (Fine+): The book has some separation at the spine inside both covers but is taped and still intact moderate wear to cover, especially along edge.

GUARANTEE: As with all my artifacts, this piece is guaranteed to be original, as described.



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